Food Fashion – Edible Clothes Anyone?

One of the Facebook groups I’m a member of is UK students and trainee bakers (ABST). People often post information about competitions, job opportunities or programs related to our industry. This week someone posted a photo of a model wearing an outfit entirely made of bread. I thought it was pretty awesome and took to Google to look up more items of edible clothing and these are the best of what I’ve found:

Photographer Ted Sabarese with designer Ami Goodheart of SOTU Productions

I love it. Being made of bread I took an instant liking to it. I don’t know that I could pull it off but the model wears it well.

Ukrainian pastry chef Valentyn Shtefano

This was made by the Ukrainian pastry chef Valentyn Shtefano for his bride’s wedding dress. This is taking the croquembouche to the next level!

Made by the German bakery group Lambertz

Well I think it looks really good, however the second it got warm, your outfit would start to melt on you, not a good look.

Photographer Ted Sabarese with designers Daniel Feld and Wesley Nault

I think this dress is beautiful and could be recreated and sold as a dress made of – dare I say it, a material such as silk.

South Korean artist Sung Yeonju

This beautiful dress created by the artist Sung Yeonju is made of egg-plant (aubergine) as part of her “wearable food” collection.

South Korean artist Sung Yeonju

Another stunning dress by Sung Yeonju made of chives.

Enjoy :)
Peace and loaf

I do not own any of these images. They have been sourced from http://shine.yahoo.com/fashion/edible-dresses-2420301.html and http://www.delish.com/food-fun/food-fashion.

Banner Photo – Fougasse Bread

I have had a lot of requests and interest about the bread in my banner photo.

I first found out about this bread as part of my product design and development unit in the second year of my degree. The class was split up into groups and each given a bread product to develop. My group was given Fougasse. We researched, came up with our own flavour combinations and designed our own shape and finished look for the product.

It is a French flat bread called fougasse and is a variation on the Italian foccacia. Fougasse was traditionally used to assess the temperature of a wood fired oven. The time it would take to bake, gave an idea of the oven temperature and whether the rest of the bread could be baked. One of the distinguishing characteristics of fougasse is that it’s often baked into a shape that is somewhat like a tree or leaf, with one end resembling the trunk and the wider opposite end being more or less round in structure, the holes represent the stems of the leaf. It’s a great snack bread, to eat on the run or as part of a meal.

Recipe
500g Strong white bread flour
300g Water
50g Olive oil
8g Yeast
10g Salt

Additions
Red onion
Olives
sun-dried tomatoes
Anchovies
Pepper
Chillies
Mozzarella
Goats cheese
Caramelised balsamic onions
Feta
Bacon
Capers
Rosemary
Thyme

The flavour combinations are endless and are great fun to play with. You could also try sweet additions.

Yield
4 at 220g
Oven temperature 200′c

Mix all the ingredients together till a dough is formed. I always use my kitchenaid with a dough hook on speed one for about 10 mins. If you are kneading by hand, once the ingredients are combined stretch and knead the dough for approximately 20 minutes until a soft dough is formed. Place it in a lightly oiled bowl to ferment for 1 hour, cover with cling film. After 40 minutes you need to knock back the dough. This is done to get rid of excess air bubbles. Push the dough a few times with your knuckles (like a light kneading) until it looks at it did before fermentation, cover and leave for the remaining 20 minutes.

Then scale at 220g (approx 250g if you have added many different ingredients). Mould into rounds and leave for a 10 minute intermediate prove. On a lightly floured surface using a rolling-pin ,roll out the dough to your chosen shape. Then with a sharp blade cut the dough and separate using your fingers to shape the holes. Place on a tray and prove for 25mins. Once proved bake in a preheated oven for 10-12mins. Remove from the oven when golden and leave to cool. Some bakers brush the finished bread with olive oil to add shine and flavour.

Bread baskets - they always look awesome

Enjoy
Peace and loaf :)

Rainy Saturday afternoon – Chilli and Cheese Sourdough Baps

You all know the feeling on a Saturday afternoon when it’s horrible, wet, grey and cold outside. I was fortunate to have my lovely sister Vered from eat now talk later staying with me. This of course meant it was acceptable to stay in, make a nice dinner and watch a film. We started brainstorming ideas of what to have for dinner, something yummy and makes you feel warm but not too heavy. We had a few boiled eggs in the fridge to make into egg mayo, we had humous and various other dips. So we decided on bread rolls. I got a piece of paper and calculated a recipe adding in  hot dried chilli and chunks of cheese. I have both a white and rye sour at home, since learning about and researching sourdoughs  I really like the combination of a rye sour with white flour, so that’s we decided on. 

Recipe
327g Strong white bread flour
186g Water
55g Rye sour
7g Yeast
7g Olive oil
6g Salt
2g Sugar
4g Dried chilli (flakes are best)
20g strong hard cheese cut into chunks
Makes 4 large baps at 160g each or 5 at 130g

As it was already afternoon and we wanted the baps for dinner I decided to add yeast as well as the sour to quicken the fermentation time without compromising on taste.

Method
Mix all the ingredients together till a dough is formed. I always use my kitchenaid with a dough hook on speed one for about 10 mins. If you are kneading by hand, once the ingredients are combined stretch and knead the dough for approximately 20 minutes until a soft dough is formed. Then place it in a lightly oiled bowl  to ferment for 2 hours, cover with cling film. After an hour and 20 minutes you need to knock back the dough. This is done to get rid of excess air bubbles. Push the dough a few times with your knuckles (like a light kneading) until it looks at it did before fermentation, cover and leave for the remaining 40 minutes.

 Remove the dough from the bowl and scale into the size required. Lightly mould into balls and leave covered for ten minutes. This allows the dough to rest and be more manageable when shaping.

Giving the dough an intermediate prove

Giving the dough an intermediate prove

After a ten minute rest re-shape the dough, I chose to make mine round baps. Place on a baking tray making sure the dough has enough space to rise and leave covered in a warm place to prove for 35 minutes. After proving top with extra cheese (if you really like it hot you could add chilli powder or pepper to season the cheese) and add to the top of the baps.

Ready for the oven

 Bake in a pre heated oven at 210′c for 15-20 minutes( if using a fan oven lower the temperature to 200′c). If you’re unsure as to whether it’s fully baked tap the bottom of the bread, if it sounds hollow it’s fully baked, if not it needs a bit longer in the oven.

The dough structure

They tasted really good and went very well with all the dips and salad! I am very happy with the way these turned out, especially as I made the recipe up on the spot. It gave me a real boost of confidence in myself, a great feeling! The combination of rye sour and white flour worked well and the dough structure was lovely.

Enjoy :)

Sour Dough Product Development

For my advanced bread exam yesterday I had to create and develop a sour dough product. Here’s the artisan bread I came up with:

Sour dough bakery pizza I topped my sour dough pizza with: passata,  onion, courgette, olives, mozzarella and finished with fresh basil.

Sweet potato, pumpkin seed and rosemary sour dough

The flavour, texture and crumb structure are divine

I couldn’t have been happier with both the way my exam went and the products that I created. It was a great baking success and these breads will certainly be going on the menu when I open my bakery :)

Peasant heaven, bruschetta and panzanella

I have finally returned from my travels this summer and have had some of the most incredible food. This last trip was to Naples. I came home with a suitcase full of cheese, capers, pasta, oregano, figs and proper Neapolitan bread. Now, this bread is full of flavour, crusty and only found in the region. It also goes stale after a day or two so after enjoying it to mop up sauces here’s how I used it.

Bruschetta

First chop tomatoes, if you can get plum or cherry they have the best flavour, if not tomatoes on the vine will do. Then add some minced garlic, basil and  a drop of oregano. Dress with olive oil and set aside.

Now we need to grill the bread. When my family made this they used the barbecue to toast the bread, which as you can imagine adds even more flavour, but at home the oven grill will do. Slice the bread to the thickness you like and place under a hot grill.
Once toasted rub with garlic and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil.

Now all that’s left to do is simply top with the tomato, be generous!

Enjoy! :)

Panzanella
Now the next day the bread is already stale. To make panzanella you need a stale bread, sourdough is best. This is traditionally a Tuscan salad using bread and tomatoes.

What you need:
Stale sourdough bread
Tomatoes
Red onion (if like me you had none in the house white will do)
Cucumber
Basil
Garlic
Extra virgin olive oil
Vinegar
A few capers

First, chop the bread into cubes. In a separate bowl mince some garlic, add the oil and vinegar untill you have created a dressing to your taste. Then pour over the bread. It will soak up the liquid and become juicy and fragrant. Leave for 30 mins to an hour.

After allowing the bread to soak up the dressing add the chopped tomatoes, cucumber, onion and capers. Then get a nice big handful of fresh basil and tear into the salad.
 Give the salad a good mix making sure all the flavours and combined.


 The Panzanella is now ready to be served up and eaten or can be left for a further few hours to mature before eating. Both ways are bellisima! :)
 Hope you enjoy them as much as I did!